Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks (1912-2006) was an African-American photographer, musician, writer and film director best known for his work’s that documented the social and economic racism in America. He became best known in the 1940s for his American documentary photojournalism, documenting; race relation’s, poverty, civil rights and urban life. In 1948 his fame rocketed due to a photo essay based on the life of a Harlem gang leader, which was said to be the most prominent publication in the world.

Gang Member Graffiti's Wall, Harlem, NY 1948

Gang Member Graffiti’s Wall, Harlem, NY 1948

Red Jackson With Child, Harlem, NY 1948

Red Jackson With Child, Harlem, NY 1948

Red and Herbie at the funeral of Maurice Gaines. Harlem, NY 1948

Red and Herbie at the funeral of Maurice Gaines. Harlem, NY 1948

 

He worked with many famous people such as Muhammad Ali, Malcom X, Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael. His most famous images are said to be Emerging Man 1952 and American Gothic 1942 which capture activism and humanitarianism.

He has written many books and received numerous awards throughout his photographic career.

 

Bibliography:

[1] BIOGRAPHY, (2016). Gordon Parks: Biography. [Online] Available from: http://www.biography.com/people/gordon-parks-37379                                             [Accessed: 08 May 2016]

[2] MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOSTON, (2016). Gordon Park’s: Back To Fort Scott. [Online] Available from: http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/gordon-parks                                [Accessed: 08 May 2016]

[3] THE GORDON PARKS FOUNDATION, (2014). About Gordon Parks. [Online] Available from: http://www.gordonparksfoundation.org/                                                              [Accessed: 06 May 2016]

 

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